quilting fun Archives - Handi Quilter

Round Robin Quilts

There’s a new display in the Handi Quilter Gallery. On the second floor at HQ HQ (Handi Quilter Headquarters) there is a gallery outside of the education studio. It features fabulous quilt displays that change throughout the year. Right now, we have a wonderful display of special group quilts, Round Robin quilts to be exact. And not just any Round Robins, but those created by our Quilt Your Desire Inspiration Squad members. As a way for them to stay connected and have a memento of their time at Handi Quilter, they participated in a Round Robin. You may have seen some of these folks in magazines or on social media.

The idea and project originated with Diana Evans. She wanted to have a “piece” of her fellow QYD squad members.

Round Robin Quilts

Round Robin quilts are medallion-style quilts pieced from the center out. Typically, the “owner” makes the center block. Then it is passed around to each person, one-by-one, who adds a border of their choosing and then passes it along to the next person. The owner does not see their quilt as it is in progress until the big reveal.

Successful group quilts are often more than the sum of their parts and this is evident in the quilts we have in the gallery. Each one is so different and spectacular. You can see the thoughtfulness and intention that went into each round.

The Gallery

Let’s take a look at the quilts. We’ll start with Diana’s, since she was the instigator.

Diana Evans

Gallery quilts

Diana Evans

Using scraps of a floral print for her center block, Diana was surprised, delighted and inspired by her finished quilt. She was completely taken aback by the use of the leopard print. It was unexpected and yet, she felt, the perfect direction.

Adam Rateliff

Adam Rateliff

Amy Domke

round robin quilt

Amy Domke

Angie Callbeck

Round Robin Quilt

Angela Callbeck

Angie used a piece of fabric that reminded her of her first glimpse of sun during her trip to Salt Lake City. She says her fellow squad members created the perfect quilt for her.

Here is the label that was sent to all the participants and signed by each person who added to the quilt. Each of the quilts has a label just like this one.

Kristina Whitney

Round Robin Quilt

Kristina Whitney

Marilyn Farquhar

Round Robin Quilt

Marilyn Farquhar

 

Round Robin Gains

Not only do you get a completed quilt top that is a treasured memento of your friends, you also get inspired. And you get a chance to stretch your skills. You work with colors outside of your comfort zone. Plus the satisfaction of knowing you put your best effort into your fellow robineer’s quilt. It’s a total win, win, win, win, win!

Give it a try!

Gather some of you best quilter friends and challenge yourselves. Be sure to have clear guidelines before you start. Diana gave her group very clear instructions and the results are fantastic. The rules included a timeline. So the participants knew when each round should be completed and sent along to the next person. She said, “the timeline quickly got trashed”. Diana also sent each participant a little journal, a fine-line black sharpie, and the printed label. The journal was such a genius idea! The owner explained the significance of the center. Then, that was used as inspiration for the subsequent rounds. And each round maker added stories of how they came up with the idea, or the fabric, or the challenges they experienced and how they overcame them. Love it! Every quilt tells a story and these journals are a record of the interesting story of these fun quilts.

If you have any hints on how to make projects like this work better, please let us know in the comments.

Thank you Quilt Your Desire Inspiration Squad for sharing your precious quilts! Not all of the Round Robin participants have quilted their quilts yet, but we know they will! We are looking forward to seeing more of these fabulous quilts.

by Mary Beth Krapil

 

 

2021-03-25T13:04:25-06:00March 26th, 2021|Categories: HQ Gallery, Inspiration, Quilt Stories|Tags: , , |2 Comments

Quilting a Vintage Quilt Top

In last week’s blog post I explained how I prepared a not-so-flat vintage quilt top for finishing. If you didn’t catch it, be sure to read it first. No worries, I’ll wait.

detail of vintage quilt top quilted

 

Basic plan

Now that I had a nice flat quilt top, I could start thinking about the quilting. I wanted to ignore the seam lines in an effort to hide all the added sashing. This would make the tulips come forward and float on the background.

I planned to stitch-in-the-ditch around each set of tulips and do minimal quilting within the tulips so that they would puff forward. To accomplish the puff, there had to be some tighter background quilting behind them. And using two layers of batting, 80/20 on the bottom and wool on top is essential.

Design ideas

Drawing design ideas on Quilter’s Preview Paper  over the quilt top with a dry erase marker is a good way to start letting the ideas become real.

preview paper over vintage quilt top

Creating designs

Using Pro-Stitcher Designer, my digitizing software, I created some designs that would go over the seams and hopefully distract from them.
I start the design process by tracing the major elements of the top on Golden Threads Quilting Paper. Then I can place a 2nd piece of Golden Threads paper over that and start sketching. If I don’t like what I have drawn, I discard the paper and take fresh piece on top. I still have my major elements underneath.


After I settle on the designs, I transfer them to my Pro-Stitcher Designer software to create the digital designs for my Pro-Stitcher robotic system on my HQ Infinity.

vintage quilt top digital design

This design will be available for purchase on Quiltable.com soon!

Quilting!

Next comes the fun of quilting and seeing the quilt top come to life. I employed a combination of Pro-Stitcher robotics, ruler-work and free-motion quilting.  I wonder what Mrs. Gibson and Ora Tyler would think of their quilt today?

detail of vintage quilt top quilted

Of course a quilt is not finished until there’s a label. I chose to use one of the spare blocks as the label. Turning the corner of the block back so that the penciled name and hand stitching is visible. I think that is such a charming aspect of this vintage top.

You can also see how the block does not lay flat.

I printed the list of names of all the contributors to the quilt, along with the quilter’s name (me) and date it was finished. Now I proudly consider myself part of this group of ladies. I have 13 new friends! And I wonder if I’m young enough to go by just Mary Beth? I know I’m not old enough to be known as Mrs. Krapil! Mary Beth Krapil will do I guess. 🙂

Have you ever quilted a vintage quilt top? Please share your experience in the comments. We’d love to see pictures!

 

by Mary Beth Krapil

 

 

Preparing a Vintage Quilt Top

I’d like to share with you my process of preparing a vintage quilt top for finishing. Each top is different and will require different things of course, but this one is my latest finish and it has an interesting story and was extra challenging.

Choosing the vintage quilt top

I loved the colors in this top the minute I saw it. And one of my favorite flowers is the tulip. Those things drew me to choose it. I did notice some fullness in the blocks, but since I have experience with quilting hand pieced vintage tops, I had confidence I could tame it. Oh boy,  was I wrong!

The Truth about vintage quilt tops

There is usually a reason these tops never get quilted. Any quilter will tell you that they have quilt tops waiting to be quilted. In modern times, it’s usually a matter of not enough hours in the day to get all our projects completed. The vintage tops that end up in estate sales or on auction sites usually have some issues that would have made quilting them difficult. Remember, most were hand quilted back in the day. This tulip quilt had some major issues. But I’m so glad I chose this one. I loved working with it and learned a few things along the way.

Preserve as much of the original as you can

I try to preserve these vintage tops as best I can. They are a piece of history. I think about the hours of work that went into the hand piecing. Just look at those pretty, even, hand stitches!

A few tucks or a stain here or there is OK, just part of the uniqueness of the piece. This quilt top was uber unique! It presented a challenge that was insurmountable without some major alterations.

After spending some time trimming frayed threads from the back, I took it to my ironing board to see how I could possibly get the top to lie a little flatter. Several hours later I came to the realization that it just was not going to happen. I had to make the difficult decision to take the quilt apart and separate the blocks.

A special group collaboration

Most of the blocks had a name written on the back in pencil (3 blocks had no name). These were not signatures, since they were all in the same handwriting. But I imagine they are a record of the maker of the block. This quilt was a collaborative group effort! Making it even more special and deserving of preservation.

Abbie

 

Kuhma

 

Laura Barton

 

Leona

 

Lizzie

 

Maude

 

Mrs. Gibson

 

Mrs. Spoor

 

Nellie Gray

 

Ora Tyler

 

Pearl

 

Stella

 

Velma

Who were these ladies?

The whole time I worked on this quilt I thought about what sort of group this might have been. Was it a quilting bee? A group who gathered around a quilting frame whenever a quilt needed quilting? Were they neighbors, friends, a church group, members of a guild? It led me to think about the groups I have had the privilege of being a part of. And the wonderful friendships I have made through quilting. I hoped these women enjoyed the same blessing I have had.

I also thought about why they might have decided to make a quilt together. Was it to comfort a sick friend? Celebrate a milestone? Donate to a worthy cause to raise money? I wondered if, back then, did they hold block exchanges? Was there many more of these quilts, one for each of the contributors? Did any of them get quilted?
I wish I knew more about these ladies.

I thought maybe they were a group with varying ages since some were just first names (younger), and some were full names, and some were surnames, Mrs. so-and-so, (older and more respected?) It was actually quite fun thinking about the possibilities. And now that I have finished the quilt, I think I am a member of the group too.

Back to work

But back to the job of preparing this top. I had to un-sew the blocks on this vintage quilt top to see if I could somehow stitch them together in a way that would let them lie flat.

My original idea was to add sashing to compensate for blocks that were not all the same size. That’s quite often a common problem with group quilts. But when I got them apart, it became apparent what the problem actually was.
The blocks were not square, or rectangular. They were an unusual shape with sort of pointy wings in each corner.

not square vintage quilt

Someone, (I wonder who?), painstakingly sewed these blocks together by hand. That was certainly a labor of love.

You can see the middles of each side are straight but then they bow outward to the pulled-out corners. I thought about adding melon shapes between the blocks but after measuring and discovering no two blocks measured the same, I gave up on that idea.

The fix

I trimmed the blocks to as square as possible without losing any of the tulip.


Because they were all different sizes I decided to add sashing to each block, to make them all the same size. I hunted for a muslin that matched the vintage muslin background.This process required a lot of accurate measuring and math.

I was hoping that the quilting would eventually hide the seams required to add the sashings, and that the tulips would simply be floating on the background.

Once the blocks were all brought to a uniform size, I sewed them back together into a quilt top. Here they are laid out ready to be sewn. I feel I preserved the look of the vintage quilt top and didn’t really alter it too much.

Sadly, I did have to eliminate four of the blocks. The piecing on those would not allow me to press them anywhere close to flat. Let me publicly apologize to those ladies whose blocks didn’t make it back into the quilt. I’m so sorry, I know you did your best.
One of those blocks did get used on the back for the label. I might just hand stitch the other three to the back of the quilt as well. Just so the group can stay together.

Now that I had a nice flat quilt top, I could start thinking about the quilting. Come back next week and I’ll share about creating the designs and quilting with my HQ Infinity.

This quilt will be featured in the May/June issue of Love of Quilting magazine.

 

by Mary Beth Krapil

 

National Quilting Month

March is National Quilting Month. It’s our favorite month of the year here at Handi Quilter.

national quilting month handi quilter

What are you going to do to celebrate? Here are TEN great ideas to help get you started.

Finish a UFO

If you have been a quilter for a while (a year? a month? a day!) you probably have a project (or 3) that isn’t quite finished and got put aside when you started something new. Maybe you ran into a problem that you couldn’t figure out how to solve. Or maybe you just lost interest. Perhaps you tried to finish before the new class you signed up for started, but you had to set it aside to concentrate on class. Whatever the reason, National Quilting Month can be your incentive to pull it out and get ‘er done.

Here are some of mine. Some. There isn’t enough room to show you all of them!

Plan a reward for finishing. Maybe a trip to the quilt shop, once the binding and label are on?

Start a new quilt

Nothing revs the quilting juices more than starting a new project. Pull out that pattern you bought and get busy picking fabrics for it.  Buy that fat quarter stack of luscious new fabrics and decide which quilt pattern will show them off the best.

Grab your sketch book to draw out the quilting design you’ve had in the back of your brain. Take the time to do what you love.

Organize your quilting space

American Patchwork and Quilting is hosting a fun 31 days to an organized sewing space challenge.

They give one task per day for each day in the month of March. This one-task-at-a-time approach seems very achievable. The challenge for me, when straightening up my studio, is resisting the urge to play with just about every item I touch.

I’m going to give this a try. Then I’ll let you know how it went. It’s not too late for you to try too! Just double up the tasks for a few days. Just think how great it will feel to play in a clean and organized studio. Wonder how long it will last? 🙂

 

Visit a Quilt Museum

You will be in awe, inspired and delighted by what you see at any and all of these places:

National Quilt Museum, Paducah, KY

International Quilt Study Center and Museum, Lincoln, NE

Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum, Golden, CO

Wisconsin Museum of Quilts and Fiber Arts, Cedarburg, WI

Texas Quilt Museum, La Grange, TX

This is by no measure a complete list. You may find one in your neck of the woods! Check out your local history museum. My little town has a wonderful history museum that has a few quilts on display.

Take a class

Handi Quilter in-store events are starting to happen again, all over the country! We have worked with healthcare experts and our retailers to devise a way to hold in-person longarm quilting classes in a safe manner. Some are hands-on classes!

 

We are also offering virtual classes. These are such a great opportunity to take a class from an expert Handi Quilter National educator from the comfort of your own home. Check out what is available here.

Share your skills

Offer to teach a friend a new quilting skill that you know, but she hasn’t tried yet.

Or spend a day teaching a child a simple sewing/quilting project.

This little girl is hooked for life!

Join a guild

It multiplies the fun of quilting when you can meet with like-minded people who share your love of fabric and thread and color and pattern. Although we can’t really meet in person for a little while longer, many guilds are meeting virtually these days. Sharing knowledge and quilts and tips and tricks only adds to the joy of quilting. Find a guild near you. You can ask at your local quilt shop for recommendations. If that doesn’t get you results, try this website. Your new quilting friends are waiting for you.

Make a community quilt

Many organizations offer opportunities for making quilts for those who need the comfort only a quilt can provide. Knowing you’re helping others multiplies the fun of making quilts. An example of one of those organizations is Quilts for Kids. Quilts for Kids is a nonprofit organization dedicated to transforming fabrics into patchwork quilts to comfort children facing serious illness, trauma, abuse, and natural disasters.

There are many more. Once again a good place to inquire is your local quilt shop or guild.

Join a social media group

Handi Quilter oversees 3 Facebook groups. The Handi Quilter group is for all machine owners and folks who are interested in Handi Quilter or longarm quilting. At almost 11,000 members there is plenty of friendly help for all your longarm questions. It’s also a great place to share what you are working on.

If you’re interested in attending Academy, (the premier annual education event held by Handi Quilter), you might want to join the HQ Academy group. Alumni and future attendees share experiences and fun in this group. The excitement grows as the date for Academy draws near!

Are you a Pro-Stitcher Designer user? There’s a group for that! Help in learning the design and digitizing program is right at your fingertips. Share your achievements and projects, ask questions, this group is just getting started so all questions are welcome.

Watch a quilting video

Handi Quilter offers a bunch of options for this! We have a YouTube channel dedicated to helping you learn to use your Handi Quilter machine. Don’t forget to subscribe and click the bell to be notified when a new video is available.

You can also catch a video once a month on the 2nd Thursday called HQ Live. We present on a variety of quilting related topics. You want to mark your calendar for HQ Live. 2nd Thursday, 11am Mountain time.

 

Or get a quick dose of quilty fun every Tuesday on our Facebook page with HQ Watch and Learn. The studio educators share tips, tricks and how-to’s. It’s quick and fun and you’re sure to learn something each week. Tuesday at high Noon Mountain time.

Don’t forget to do something extra-quilty on National Quilting Day! March 20, 2021.

by Mary Beth Krapil

Ruler of the Month Club

If you have never joined the Ruler of the Month club with Handi Quilter, I’m here to fill you in on what it is all about.

What is it?

If you enjoy ruler work, you’ll love the opportunity to expand both your ruler collection and your ruler skills. Each month in the six-month series we introduce an exclusive, brand-new ruler to the Handi Quilter line-up. Along with the ruler, you’ll receive video education and design ideas. It’s a great way to gain ruler work confidence and build your skills.

Members get special pricing and exclusive access to the rulers during the 6 month club. That’s more than $50 total savings for all six rulers! At the end of the club, the rulers will become available on-line and at retailers for everyone.

When you complete all 6 months you will receive a special club member gift. ROMC8 will start in March and run through August.

How to Join

You sign up at a local retailer. Find one here.

If your retailer is not close to you, or if your local retailer is not participating, you can find a retailer who accepts participants and sends rulers via mail. Find one here. Simply type in your zip code and check the box “Ruler of the Month”. Once you find a few, give them a call and ask if you can join via mail.

You can ONLY participate through a retailer. You cannot join online at handiquilter.com.

ROMC8 Rulers

The theme for the Ruler of the Month Club 8 is Boundless Borders

Here are the featured rulers (shh – don’t tell anyone I showed them to you!).

March – On Point Template

ruler of the month 8

April – Swish (I think this will be my favorite!)

ruler of the month 8

May – Concave Curves

ruler of the month 8

June – Cable  (I think this will be my favorite!)  ((Can I have 2 favorites?))

ruler of the month 8

July – Diamond

ruler of the month 8

August – Pointed Arc

ruler of the month 8

And let’s not forget about the Club Member gift!

Looks pretty cool, right?  I know I can’t wait!

OH! one more thing, I almost forgot….

Every month, on the first Tuesday, be sure to tune in to HQ Watch and Learn on the Handi Quilter Facebook page. It’s at Noon Mountain time but you can find it on the Facebook page all week too. The Watch and Learn topic will be the club ruler for that month.

by Mary Beth Krapil

 

 

 

 

 

Paper-pieced Valentine

Here’s a little Valentine treat for you, because we love you! A quick, last minute project for your favorite Valentine. It’s a paper-pieced Valentine heart that you can make into pillow, a tote bag. Or make several and make a small quilt or wall hanging, or just one for a mini. You’ll probably come up with some more ideas. Be sure to share in the comments!

Kim Sandberg, studio educator, created this cute design using Pro-Stitcher Designer. Pro-Stitcher Designer is a full-featured design software for creating paper or digital quilting motifs. It gives you the ability to quickly design, edit, or customize any quilting motif you can imagine. Besides all that, you can create paper-piecing designs as well!

Kim tells about it in this video:

Download the pattern here.

Then let us know how you used your paper-pieced Valentine.

You’re welcome!

Make a Stencil

I told you last week I would show you how to make a stencil from Golden Threads quilting paper. It’s easy and fun and results in a easy, follow-the-line, free-motion quilting guide that will make your quilts look fabulous!

Start with a design

You can take one of your fantastic doodles.

Or maybe something you found in a magazine or a book.

You might have seen a fabulous quilting design in nature,

or on some tile or carpet, or on a tissue box,

 

or on a plate.

Look at the fabrics in your quilt,

there might be a super cute design. Inspiration for quilting designs are truly everywhere! Be sure to have your camera ready to capture them.

Draw and trace

Draw on regular paper first. Keep in mind the size you will need for your quilt. Make adjustments until it is perfect. As you are drawing, think like a quilter and make the design continuous, to minimize stops and starts.

Once you are happy, trace your design onto Golden Threads Quilting Paper. BTW, all this drawing and tracing is great practice for when you actually quilt the design!

Make a stencil

Take your GT paper to your machine and pin it to a quilt sandwich.

Set your stitch regulation for a longer stitch. I set my HQ Infinity to 6 spi.

Take the thread out of your needle and stitch the design. The needle will punch holes in the paper and you now have a stencil to

mark your quilt

Position your stencil where you want the design. Using your pounce pad, swipe over the paper.

You have nice lines to follow as you quilt!

QUILT

Once you have quilted the design, the pounce powder will easily brush away.

Now you can create a stencil from any design you can dream up!

by Mary Beth Krapil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Win a Moxie

Yes, you read that right. You can get a chance to win a Moxie longarm quilting machine of your very own! Just by attending a quilt show. It’s a win-win!

Houston International Quilt Festival is going virtual this year (thanks 2020). The biggest, and one of the best quilt shows of the year will host a virtual on-line show, so that we can get our fix of quilt viewing and vendor shopping and learning in classes. You can get the details here.

Win a Moxie™ Longarm Quilting Machine

Every person who purchases a ticket to Virtual Quilt Festival will automatically be entered into a drawing to win a FREE HQ Moxie™ Longarm Quilting Machine. One random lucky winner will be chosen from all the VQF attendees and class participants.

The show will run Dec 3 thru Dec 5, 2020. Classes begin Dec 3, 2020.  Ticket Sales and Class/Lecture/Forum Enrollment is open now. Tickets are $10.

Your show pass will include:

  • Quilts on Display – Hundreds of quilts in Special Exhibits and Quilt Contest
  • Vendor Mall – Shopping and special promotions in one venue
  • Open Studios™ – 15-minute product demos
  • Games, voting in the Quilt Contest Viewer’s Choice, and other events
  • Interaction among virtual show participants including attendees, instructors, and vendors
  • Special Live Lecture, December 3, 2020, 6:00– 7:00pm CST – Jenny Lyon’s Quilting is a Contact Sport

Classes, Lectures and Forums will be available for an extra fee.

Purchase your ticket today! Who knows? You might just win a Moxie.

Good Luck!

by Mary Beth Krapil

 

 

 

 

Handi Felting Foot Kit

I’ve been having a blast creating new fabrics and projects using my felting foot on my Amara. The Handi Felting Foot Kit transforms your HQ longarm into a felting machine with infinite possibilities! It creates new fun you can have with your Handi Quilter machine. I must give you the Sewing Surgeon General’s warning: felting is addictive.

Handi Felting Foot

 

What is Felting?

The Handi Felting Foot Kit puts a modern twist on an old way of creating embellished fabric by meshing fibers together so they interlock and become one. The kit includes a needle body that holds 5 barbed needles that will punch the fibers and mesh them together and a special foot that will protect your fingers and hold the fibers in place as you work.

Select your fibers

Needle felted cloth is fun, easy and quick to create. All that is need is a base fiber and bits of other fibers to add to the base. The fibers can be anything that can be penetrated by a needle: silk, yarn, wool or silk roving, tulle, cheese cloth, ribbons, fleece, lace, felt, burlap, sheers batting. Some fibers work better than others for this technique; experimentation is key. At least one of the 2 fibers you wish to combine needs to be fibrous, like felt or wool. Trying to felt 2 layers of a smooth finish fiber like quilting cotton or 2 layers of sheers doesn’t work well. You must play with your yummy fibers and textiles and see what you get!

Machine Prep

Once you have your assortment of fibers, refer to the Handi Felting Foot Instruction Manual to get the needles and foot attached to your machine. You can also watch the video to see how to get set up.

If you quilt on a movable machine it is helpful to attach your ruler base to provide a flat surface for laying out your fibers.
Remove the bobbin case from the machine and set it aside. Felting creates huge quantities of lint.

Be sure to clean the bobbin area frequently while felting and when finished clean thoroughly and oil the bobbin race before starting a quilting project.

 

 

 

 

 

Machine Settings

Set the machine to manual mode. Go slow when first starting until you have a feel for how it goes. I like the machine speed to be about 500 SPM. This allows me to move at a nice moderate pace. You want to keep moving, staying in one place too long can create a hole or can push all the fibers to the back of the piece. Different fibers require different amounts of felting to meld the fibers together.
Set your needle to stop in the up position so that you can move away and add more fibers without having to raise the needles.

Mounting the base fabric

If you needle felt with a movable machine, (Amara, Forte, Simply Sixteen, Avante, Fusion), you can mount your base fabric by attaching it to the leaders. If the piece is not large enough, simply baste some muslin or scrap fabric to the edges and attach that fabric to the leaders. Mounting to the leaders is not necessary however, you can always use channel locks to keep your machine stationary and use the ruler base to give a surface to support the fabric. That allows you to move your fabric under the needles just like you would do on a stationary machine. It works well for  smaller pieces. If you needle felt on your Sweet Sixteen or Capri, you are ready to go.

Getting started felting

Start simple with two layers of craft felt. Use one piece for the base and cut out a simple shape from another piece. Lay the shape where you’d like it on the base fabric. Move the machine over the shape and start by lightly going over the entire shape to tack it down starting in the center and moving out to the edges. Once tacked in place go back and felt securely. You will quickly see how fast or slow you need to move to get the desired results.

Next try some yarn. Use caution so as to not get your fingers near the needles. Needle felting is a very organic technique so don’t be too worried about being exact. Try felting the yarn as it comes from the skein and also try separating the fibers.

 

Now you’re hooked

Add as much or as little you’d like. Once you take it off the frame you can trim it and add a piece of felt or cotton batting to the back, running a line of stitches down the center. Fold over on the stitch line and you’ve got a fancy little needle book to use for those hand stitching projects.

Felting: You’ve got this

Learning to needle felt is an easy transition from free motion quilting. Since you are already a longarm quilter, you already have the feel for free-motion quilting and needle felting is very much the same motion. You might not be accustomed to running your machine in manual mode. Since there are no “stitches” to show and no thread, it doesn’t matter and the smooth sound of the machine at a constant speed helps you to move smoothly. One thing you want to remember is to have the machine set at a faster speed and you should move the fabric (or the machine) at a slower rate. This will help prevent breaking needles. Also remember to have the needle stop set for UP. Learn more by watching the HQ Watch and Learn show about the Felting foot.

What will you felt first?

by Mary Beth Krapil

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