Uncategorized Archives - Handi Quilter

Stay In the Know

Facebook (Meta) has started to change its algorithm that decides what you see in your newsfeed every day. If you want to stay in the know about all things Handi Quilter you’ll want to be sure you are following our Facebook page and haven’t simply “liked” it. If you’re not sure how to do that I’ve got you! Here are instructions with pictures. After all, you wouldn’t want to miss all the great stuff on our page. Weekly HQ Watch and Learn shows and announcements of all the fun going on at Handi Quilter are just a couple of the things you’ll see.

Open HQ Facebook page

 

Start by going to the Handi Quilter Facebook page. You can get there by typing facebook.com/handiquilter. The header looks like this:

 

Click on the 3 dots

Click on the 3 little dots shown circled in red here (bottom right corner):

 

Choose Follow Settings

From the drop-down menu choose Follow Settings

 

Set as a favorite

Set as a favorite so that you will always see Handi Quilter posts in your feed.

 

Notifications

The bottom half of the Follow Settings menu is for notifications.

 

 

Click the little arrow to the right of Posts

 

 

Set to Standard.

Then click the back arrow in the upper left.

Click Video.

 

Set to All Notifications then click the back arrow.

Click Live Video.

 

Set to All notifications. You absolutely want to see HQ Watch and Learn!!  Then click the back arrow.

Be sure that Offers is turned on (it should be blue). Of course you’ll want to know when something goes on sale, right?

 

Last but VERY IMPORTANT! Click UPDATE to save your settings. Update is all the way down at the bottom. You may need to scroll.

 

Now you’ll be all set and you’ll stay in the know about all things Handi Quilter.

 

Thanks so much for following us on social media. We love staying in touch with every member of our HQ family!

 

 

by Mary Beth Krapil

 

2022-05-08T04:51:20-06:00May 8th, 2022|Categories: Uncategorized|1 Comment

Swirly Grid Design

We have used all the shapes to make continuous grid designs except for the swirl (or hook). So today we will dive deep into the swirly grid design.

The Swirl

Remember the swirl or hook for the 5 basic shapes?

Like the S shape from last week, we need to make some modifications to the shape. To make our path continuous, the shape must start on the left and end on the right. I accomplished this by extending the line leading into the swirl and the line leading out. Then I spread them apart like this:

Notice that I also closed the swirl, or over-stitched the swirly part.  I did this is because this design is a lot of quilting in each grid space. If your grid is large, feel free to leave the open swirl with the double lines, like the original shape. Make it your own!

My quilting starts at the green dot on the left and arcs down slightly.

When I get about half-way across the grid space, I start my swirl.

Backtrack along the swirl.

Then arc up towards the grid intersection.

One thing to keep in mind while you are quilting this shape is that you cannot go too deep into the grid space. You have to allow room for a swirl on each of the four sides of the space. You can add a chalked dot or circle to the center of the space as a reminder, like we did when we used the loop shape.

The Path

To keep things consistent, let’s use the same grid.

 

Start in the upper left corner and stitch the shape across the top. Just like all the other shapes before.

 

The Mantra

Like the S-shape, it is SUPER important that the shape is stitched the same each time. In this case, the swirl has to go in the same direction. I chose to stitch the swirl swirling back towards where I started.

 

To help me keep the swirls going in the correct direction, I use the mantra “SWIRL BACK”.  And just like the S-shape, this mantra will be helpful when you you have to change the orientation of the shape to fill the grid.

 

Next stitch down the side. SWIRL BACK.

 

Keep the path going

As we did before we will work across the horizontal grid line. But for this design, like the Terry Twist, the serpentine path will not work. You will simply stitch across the top of the line. Keep the mantra going!

You can see how the swirl is opposite of the ones going across the top of the grid. It’s easy to get confused and turned around without the mantra, but the mantra will keep your shapes going the way they should. SWIRL BACK.

Next, stitch across the bottom of the horizontal grid line back towards the right. Keep the mantra going!

Without the mantra, you’ll be sure to get confused on this step. With the mantra you’ll just go along easy-peasy.

Continue on down the right side, and across and back on the next horizontal grid line. Keep the mantra going!

Stitching down the right side brings you to the bottom of the grid. Begin to stitch across.

 

Just as before, work the vertical grid line up.

 

Can you see now how using a chalked dot in the center of the grid space will help?

Next, work your way back down the vertical line. Keeping the mantra? Of course you are! If you don’t, you’ll be getting out the seam ripper.

 

Move across the bottom to the next vertical line and stitch up and down. Then across the bottom to the left side. Then all that’s left to do is stitch up the left side, back to where you started!

 

This swirly grid is great for larger grids. There is a lot of quilting in each grid space!

Did you notice that this intricate design used the skills we acquired when we learned the simpler shapes grid designs? We used the path that gets us from start to finish with just one start and one stop. We used a guideline (dot), we modified the shape slightly, we used a mantra to keep the pattern going correctly.  When you come up with your own new designs be sure to remember your skills and put them to work for you!

 

The Name

I have not named this one. Will you help me give it a cool name? Add your name suggestion in the comments. I can’t wait to see what you creatives come up with!

 

by Mary Beth Krapil

 

More Grid Designs

Last time, we took our grid work to a new level by using more of the basic shapes. We followed the same path using the grid. It’s time for more grid designs! Using the S shape and the (mostly) same path.

I saved this shape  and the hook for last because they are a bit trickier to stitch and keep the grid going. But as always, I have hints and pro tips to make it fun and easy. More grid designs = more fun!

S shape

Remember the S shape?

Such a useful shape! If you’ve been following along with the Free Motion Quilting for Beginners Series you should be very familiar with it. If you’d like to start the series from the beginning, start here.

For this grid design we are going to modify the S shape a little. We need to exaggerate one side of the S and flatten out the other side. Like this:

I named the two parts of this S shape. You’ll see why in a bit. The exaggerated side is the “BUMP” and the flattened out side is the “SLIDE”.

The Path

Use the same 9-patch grid.

 

Start in the upper left corner and stitch the shape across the top. Just like before.

The Mantra

It is SUPER important that the shape is stitched the same each time. The BUMP first and then the SLIDE. So I use those words as my mantra.

Bump and Slide – Bump and Slide – Bump and Slide……

This mantra will be ever so helpful when you start changing directions.

Next, stitch down the side. Bump and Slide.

 

As we did before we will work across the horizontal grid line. But for this design, the serpentine path will not work. You will simply stitch across the top of the line. Keep the mantra going!

Can you see now why we need a mantra? The S shapes going across to the left are opposite of the ones we stitched across the top of the grid. It would be easy to get confused and turned around without the mantra.

Next stitch across the bottom of the horizontal grid line back to the right. Keep the mantra going! Bump and Slide.

Without the mantra, you’ll be sure to get confused on this step. With the mantra you’ll just go along easy-peasy.

 

Continue on down the right side, and across and back on the next horizontal grid line. Keep the mantra going!

 

Stitching down the right side brings you to the bottom of the grid. Begin to stitch across.

 

Just as before, work the vertical grid line up.

Are you noticing how the S-shapes are nesting together? Cool!

 

Next, work your way back down the vertical line. Keeping the mantra? Of course you are! If you don’t, you’ll be getting out the seam ripper.

 

Move across the bottom to the next vertical line and stitch up and down. Then across the bottom to the left side. Then all that’s left to do is stitch up the left side, back to where you started!

I love the movement this design brings!

The name

This design is know as “Terry Twist”. It was named for the great quilter, author, and teacher, Sally Terry, who originated the design. You’ll want to check out her books and if you ever get a chance to take a class from her, DO NOT pass up the opportunity! You will learn a ton and have the most fun ever.

Here’s some real-life grid-work quilting. You can see a nice example of Continuous Curve (top right) and Terry Twist (bottom left). Notice the actual grid is not showing. I marked the grid on the fabric with blue water soluble marker. After quilting I rinsed the marks away. When we have seam lines on the quilt marking is not necessary. But where you have no seams, mark that grid. Sometimes you will want to stitch the grid and other times not.

The center circle is also grid work. A simple cross hatch is grid-work!

Next up, we will explore using swirls or hooks for more grid designs.

 

by Mary Beth Krapil

 

 

 

 

 

UNCOVERED: The Ken Burns Collection and Handi Quilter

UNCOVERED: The Ken Burns Collection

Prolific film-maker and documentarian Ken Burns loves antique American quilts. “Uncovered: The Ken Burns Collection” showcases 26 colorful historic American quilts, dating from the 1850s to the 1940s. The exhibit is on loan from the private collection of the legendary documentarian.

UNCOVERED, The Ken Burns Collection is at the Riverfront Museum in Peoria, Illinois from March 5th to June 5th.

Each of these textiles represents a moment in time and American history. A nexus of individuals and geography and culture that can never be fully recovered. But which is nevertheless represented in these strikingly graphic compositions.
— Ken Burns

The International Quilt Museum at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln organized the exhibition.  The IQM owns the world’s largest publicly held quilt collection.   Peoria is one of just three cities to host the extraordinary collection. This is the last stop on the rare public tour of this amazing display of American history.

 

Uncovered and Handi Quilter

Handi Quilter retailers, Mike and Brenda Gelsinger, are owners of The Fabric Patch in Pana, IL.

 

They have been providing quilting services and supplies throughout their community since 2011. Their goal is for every customer to be completely satisfied with their purchase. Because they provide exceptional customer service and quality quilting supplies they are able to accomplish this goal.

Handi Quilter is proud to have Brenda and Mike as part of our network of dedicated retailers. They have earned the HQ Way Award and The HQ Top Sales Award.

Peoria Riverfront Museum partnered with expert area quilters to create programming around the exhibition. The museum officials and the local quilt guild asked Brenda and Mike to represent just how far quilting has come.

Mr. Burn’s documentary is about the history of quilting. Mike and Brenda set up a Handi Quilter Amara with Pro-Stitcher at the museum to demonstrate the future of quilting today.

 

They chose the perfect example. The state-of-the-art features of the Amara are on the cutting edge of quilting technology today.

The Pro-Stitcher Premium quilting system integrates world-class quilting machines with the latest computer technology.

 

So we want to say a big Thank You to the Gelsingers and The Fabric Patch for all they do to help their customers finish more quilts the 21st century way!

If you are in the area of Peoria, IL, do NOT miss this rare opportunity! Visit the museum. And while you’re at it, stop by and say “Hi!” to Mike and Brenda at The Fabric Patch in Pana. You’ll be glad you did.

 

by Mary Beth Krapil

Grid Designs – Level Up

Now that you know how to complete a continuous curve design, it’s time to level up our grid work. And it will be simple to do! We started with a curve, one of the five basic shapes. We can use the other four shapes using the same stitch path as we did for continuous curve.

 

Pro tip: This is exactly how to expand your free-motion cache of designs. Take something you know and make a small change. Voila! New design!

Straight lines

We know the path to stitch. We will simply change the shape that we stitch. Let’s start with an easy one. Straight lines.

Start with the same grid.

 

 

Start in the upper left corner like we did with the curve. Quilt a V shape. Don’t drop down too far in to the space. You need to leave room for the other V’s that will be coming.

 

Continue on with the stitch path we used for continuous curves. Across the top and down the right side.

 

Serpentine across the first horizontal grid line.

 

And serpentine back to the right.

 

Pro Tip: Mark 4 dots with chalk or washable marker in each grid space to give yourself a goal. It will also help to keep your V’s a bit more uniform.

 

Continue on along the stitch path in the same manner as the continuous curve design from last week.  Work all your horizontal grid lines as you work your way down the right side.

Stitch the vertical grid lines using the serpentine method.

 

Keep going till you finish where you started.

To level up this design, make it as uniform as you can. Some tips that will make the design more uniform: use a ruler for quilting your straight lines and use a measuring tool to mark you guide dots so they are evenly spaced. Note, you don’t have to use these tips. The design still looks great stitched completely free motion and without the guide dots. Do what makes you happy!

More shapes

What about the other three of the five basic shapes?

Loops

Change the shape to a loop. Loops are easy and fun to quilt.

 

Use the trick of guide dots to keep your loops from going too far into the center of the grid space.

 

Let’s level up and start with a little different loop, and let them over lap in the center. Fun! It’s  an entirely different look.

For this design I put a guide dot in the very center of the grid spaces. Then I tried to just touch the dot with my loops.

 

This is where that 15 minutes of practice, I mean PLAY, every day, really becomes fun. Creating new designs for your stash.

Have some fun trying different ways to use the loops and straight lines and see what you come up with! Please share in the comments.

We will explore the other two shapes soon!

Happy gridding!

 

by Mary Beth Krapil

 

 

Grid Designs – Free Motion Quilting for Beginners

Recently, there was an HQ Watch and Learn Show about quilting grid designs. Wait, what? You haven’t heard about HQ Watch and Learn?

HQ Watch and Learn Logo

Every Tuesday at noon Mountain time (2pm Eastern, 1pm Central, 11am Pacific, 7pm London, 5am Wednesday Melbourne, Australia) we present a video on our Facebook page. It’s entertaining, informative and inspirational! If you haven’t already, be sure to Like and Follow Handi Quilter on Facebook. That way you’ll get notified before the show. If you can’t be there during the live presentation, the show will remain on our Facebook page for later viewing.  The videos are also available on our YouTube Channel.

What’s even better,  you can ask questions in the comments on the Facebook page. And you’ll get expert answers from the Handi Quilter educators!

Watch the show on grid designs here. after you finish reading!

Grid Designs

So back to grid designs.

Q: What are they?

A: Any design you quilt that is based on an underlying grid.

Q: Where does the grid come from?

A: You can use the piecing seam lines on your quilt. Think about a nine-patch block.

Line drawing of 9 patch star block

It has an automatic grid.

line drawing of 9 patch star block with grid highlighted

Q: OK, I see the grid. Now what do I do with it?

A:  So many things!

If you have been following along with the Free Motion Quilting for Beginners posts, you know lots about the 5 basic shapes. If you are new to this, start reading here.

Start with a curve

Let’s start with a simple curve. I’ll walk you through the stitch path to quilt a design called Continuous Curve or Orange Peel. Let’s try it on the 9-patch block.

We will use the seam lines of the 9-patch as our grid.

Start in the upper left corner and stitch a curve. Remember to look ahead at the intersection of the grid to get a nice smooth curve. You want to hit that intersection as accurately as possible.

Stitch two more curves across the top of the grid, using the grid as your guide.

When you get to the end of the grid, stitch a curve down the right side.

Now you will quilt the first horizontal grid line. Stitch a curve to the left.

You may be tempted to continue on like this:

But don’t do it!

Photo by Monstera

Instead quilt in what we call

serpentine

Like this:

There’s a really good reason for this! When you stitch back to the right, you’ll want to create nice crisp crossovers at the grid intersections (red circles).

If you don’t serpentine, it’s up to you to be super accurate in hitting the points of the grid intersection. If you miss, the design doesn’t look so good.

SO, serpentine to get better results. When you crossover your first curves on the way back, the crossovers form the perfect crisp points!

 

Continue down the right side.

Then serpentine, across and back, on the next horizontal grid line.

Continue down the right side and start across the bottom. Stop when you get to the first vertical grid line.

Serpentine up that vertical grid line. With these curves you do need to give it your best effort to hit the crossovers that you stitched when you worked the horizontal lines. Remember the secret to curves!  Look ahead at your goal. Do not look at the needle as you stitch.

 

If you are more comfortable stitching one side on the way up and the other side on the way down, do what works for you. I prefer to continue with the serpentine path. Do what gives you the best results in hitting the points.

Travel across the bottom to the next vertical grid line.

Stitch up and down the vertical grid line.

Stitch to the left and start up the left side of the block.

Continue up the left side, remembering to look ahead and hit your points accurately,

When you get back to where you started, you’re finished!  The reason this design is called continuous curve is because it puts a curve on each grid line with only one start and one stop. When quilting, we really like to be as continuous as possible. So that we don’t have to waste time securing  thread ends.

I love how this design forms a secondary design of circles that appear to overlap.

The Finish!

Here is how the design will look on our block:

And another block:

Notice we skipped some of the seam lines and just used the ones that form a 9-patch.  But what if……………

What if we did a continuous curve using every seam line?

This creates a very different look. You can really see the overlapping circles on this one!

 

Stay tuned for more grid designs in our Free Motion for Beginners series. We will use some of the other basic shapes to create interesting designs that look a lot harder than they really are.

 

You can go watch the HQ Watch and Learn video now.

 

by Mary Beth Krapil

 

Gallery – Educator Challenge Quilts 2021

If you have ever been lucky enough to visit Handi Quilter, you know we have a gallery on the 2nd floor. There’s always a quilt show there! A new collection was recently hung, the 2021 Educator Challenge quilts.

The Challenge

A little history: most years the Handi Quilter national educators are issued a challenge of some sort. In 2021 we were given some fabrics and asked to make 12 identical 8″ blocks. We could choose any block to make. When we met, we saved one block and turned in the remaining eleven to be distributed among those who participated. That meant we received 11 different blocks made by our fellow educators. The real challenge came when we were told to include the blocks in a quilt, any size, any design, with, of course, FABULOUS quilting.

The Gallery

The gallery is open to the public most days when the Handi Quilter offices are open. If you would like to visit, just give us a call to let us know you’re coming. (You can also get a tour of the building if you wish.) Many of you cannot visit the HQ gallery in person, so I thought I’d share the quilts with you here. They are beautiful!

panorama of a portion of the Handi Quilter gallery

 

So without further ado…..

The Quilts

Waynna Kershner

Hopscotch With a Twist by Waynna Kershner

 

detail of Hopscotch With a Twist

 

Label for Hopscotch With a Twist

Vicki Kerkvliet

I Get By With a Little Help From My Friends by Vicki Kerkvliet

 

label for I Get By With a Little Help From My Friends

 

detail of I Get By With a Little Help From My Friends

Patty Kerns

Circle of Friends by Patty Kerns

 

Label from Circle of Friends

 

detail of Circle of Friends

Micki Chappelear

Friends by Micki Chappelear

 

label from Friends

 

Detail of Friends

Mary Yoder

Block Exchange 2021 by Mary Yoder

 

Label from Block Exchange 2021

 

Detail of Block Exchange 2021

Martha Higdon

HQ Challenge by Martha Higdon

 

Label for HQ Challenge

 

Detail of HQ Challenge

Linda Gosselin

A Walk Around the Block With Friends by Linda Gosselin

 

Label for A Walk Around the Block With Friends

 

Detail of A Walk Around the Block With Friends

 

Lana Russel

Handi Quilter Block Exchange Challenge by Lana Russel

 

Label for Handi Quilter Block Exchange Challenge

 

Detail of Handi Quilter Block Exchange Challenge

 

Kristina Whitney

 

Peachy Keen by Kristina Whitney

 

Label for Peachy Keen

 

Detail of Peachy Keen

 

Work or Play by Kristina Whitney

 

Label for Work or Play???

 

Detail of Work or Play???

Kimberly Flannagan

On-Point by Kimberly Flannagan

 

Label for On-Point

 

Detail of On-Point

Kim Sandberg

Connections by Kim Sandberg

 

Label for Connections

Detail of Connections

 

Kaye Collins

Every Which Way by Kaye Collins

 

Label for Every Which Way

 

Detail of Every Which Way

Karen Arnold

Traveling Quilting Circle by Karen Arnold

 

Label for Traveling Quilting Circle

 

Detail of Traveling Quilting Circle

 

Judy Hays

Finding Common Ground by Judy Hays

 

Label for Finding Common Ground

 

Detail of Finding Common Ground

Harriet Carpanini

Block Party by Harriet Carpanini

Label for Block Party

 

Gina Siembieda

Blocks By by Gina Siembieda

Label for Blocks By

 

Detail of Blocks By

 

Gail Berry-Graham

ICK by Gail Berry-Graham

 

Label for ICK

 

Detail of ICK

Diane Henry

Block Swap Challenge by Diane Henry

 

Label for Block Swap Challenge

 

Detail of Block Swap Challenge

 

Denise Dowdrick

Quilting with Friends by Denise Dowdrick

 

Label for Quilting with Friends

 

Detail of Quilting with Friends

Dee Maier-Adams

Handi Quilter Educator Challenge 2021 by Dee Maier-Adams

 

Label for Handi Quilter Educator Challenge 2021

 

Detail of Handi Quilter Educator Challenge 2021

 

Chris Davidson

Educator’s Block Swap Challenge Quilt by Chris Davidson

 

Label for Educator’s Block Swap Challenge Quilt

 

Detail of Educator’s Block Swap Challenge Quilt

 

Barb Tatera

Mid-Century Modern Meets Modern Quilting by Barb Tatera

Label for Mid-Century Modern Meets Modern Quilting

 

Detail of Mid-Century Modern Meets Modern Quilting

 

Amy VanGurp

Stolen Moments by Amy VanGurp

 

Label for Stolen Moments

 

Detail of Stolen Moments

 

Allison Spence

 

Block Swap Challenge by Allison Spence

 

Label for Block Swap Challenge

 

Detail of Block Swap Challenge

 

Aimee Losee

I Want to Play by Aimee Losee

 

Label for I Want to Play

 

Detail of I Want to Play

We hope someday you can visit the gallery. You never know what you might see but one thing is certain, it will be inspiring!

 

by Mary Beth Krapil

Echo Quilting Designs – Free Motion Quilting for Beginners

Building on last week’s post about echo quilting, this week we will talk about creating designs with simple shapes and echoing. Now that you’ve practiced a bit and have that skill in your toolbox.  These echo quilting designs work well for both Edge-to-Edge and background fills. It just depends on how large or small you quilt the design.

Let’s dive right in!

Photo by Tima Miroshnichenko from Pexels

 

Like I said, start with a simple shape (remember those 5 basic shapes?)

Peacock Feathers

There’s a design called Peacock Feathers. You start with a teardrop shape.

 

Then echo it.

 

Echo it again.

 

Right from where you end come out with another teardrop shape. Then echo it twice. My mantra for this design is teardrop-echo-echo-teardrop-echo-echo…… Read this post to find out how mantras can help while quilting.

Pro Tip: You can control the direction the design takes by which way you quilt that first teardrop. The side the first teardrop ends up on, is the side you will end on after two echos.

If I quilt the next teardrop the same way I quilted the first two, I will end on the right. When I switch directions, I will end on the left and I can travel in that direction to fill my space.

 

Continue with teardrop-echo-echo to fill up your space remembering to switch directions to get where you want to go.

 

If you get stuck in a corner (because you got distracted) simply add another echo.

 

When there is a small space to fill that will not accommodate the whole peacock feather, only do one echo.

 

Or just stitch a teardrop. No one will ever know!

 

You can do this large as an edge-to-edge design. Or small as a fill design behind appliques or larger quilting motifs. It is a fast and easy design to stitch.

And looks much nicer quilted.

 

Pro Tip: Do you see that blue line in the bottom right of the photo above?  That is blue chalk that has been washed 3-4 times with different concoctions. So the tip is: Only use white chalk for marking your quilts. Never use colored chalk! Or at the very least, test before you mark to make sure your marks will come out.

Can you think of other basic shapes that could make a nice echo quilting design? We’ll explore a few more next week!

 

by Mary Beth Krapil

 

 

2022-01-26T15:34:03-07:00January 29th, 2022|Categories: Uncategorized|2 Comments

Can You Hear the Echo? Free Motion Quilting for Beginners

Another free motion skill you will want to master is echo quilting. It has so many uses! Echo quilting is uniformly distanced quilting lines that outline or echo a shape. This simple technique can have really big impact on your quilts.

If you want to showcase a patch or applique or a quilting motif, echoing is a great way to accomplish that.

A classic example of echo quilting is seen on Hawaiian quilts. The quilting echos a central applique and is repeated until the entire space (or quilt) is filled.

Image of a Hawaiian quilt Hiart, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

Hiart, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

In the above example, the quilter utilized echo quilting inside the applique as well. Notice how the echo quilting emphasizes the shape of the applique without distracting from it.

Hawaiian quilting is an extreme example. Sometimes you’ll just use a single echo line to

frame a particular element.

Like this mug rug.

 

Look at the difference when the shape is not echoed.

The echoing really accentuates the shape.

When you take the time to quilt a challenging or intricate design you want it to be noticed. Like feathers. Feathers always look better with an echo.

 

Create a frame around a particular element

Echoing on both sides of the string of pearls makes it stand out.

 

A double echo around the central octagon is very effective.

 

If two is good, three must be better! (PSA: this thinking does not apply to adult beverages or medications.)

Fill spaces

Concentric echos fill the center of this ring.

 

Try off-setting the echos for a completely different look.

 

It works for filling the space outside of the ring as well.

 

Multiple echos with varying spacing

can be quite interesting

These echos create faux borders which can be filled with any design of your choice.

 

The gentle wave that is on both sides of the small circles has an echo on the top and bottom with a deeper wave echo. Then at the top, a wide-spaced echo that is symmetrical with the wave below it sets the design apart. Below, a less-formal set of echos fills the space between the wave design and the larger circles.

By taking a simple shape and echoing it, I created a new cool design!

How to do it?

A great no-mark way to stitch a simple echo is to use the edge of your hopping foot as a guide for spacing. On our Handi Quilter machines the needle is 1/4 inch away from the edge of the foot. So, if you glide the edge of the foot along the edge of the thing you are echoing, you’ll get a nice 1/4th inch echo.

If you want different spacing you could give the Handi Echo Feet a try. They come in a set of three, for three different sizes of echos. The feet provide a fixed interval to use when echo quilting around a motif or using rulers. Sizes are a 3/8-inch interval, a 1/2-inch interval, and a 3/4-inch interval. These are compatible with all HQ machines with Interchangeable Foot Mount. If your machine is newer than November 2014 you have the correct foot mount. If not, there is a Conversion kit available to update your machine to be able to use all the cool feet available.

Remember you can always do less-formal free flowing echos too!

Join next week when I’ll show you some useful designs that incorporate echoing.

 

by Mary Beth Krapil

 

 

 

 

 

 

2022-01-22T11:06:11-07:00January 22nd, 2022|Categories: Uncategorized|2 Comments

Happy New Year!

I want to wish each of you a happy new year! What a wonderful thought it is that some of our best quilts haven’t even happened yet. I hope some of what I write here will help you make your best quilt EVER!

My wish for you ……. that your seam ripper will collect dust in 2022. Enjoy every stitch!

Happy New Year photowith clock and holiday tree

 

With warmest wishes for health and happiness,

Mary Beth

P.S.  If there’s something you’d like to see discussed here on the blog this year, let me know in the comments.

2021-12-09T14:39:17-07:00January 1st, 2022|Categories: Uncategorized|2 Comments
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